Category Archives: Truman Greenway in the News

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The City of Savannah and Chatham County have resumed efforts on the long awaited Truman Linear Park Trail. We’ve seen the benefits of similar trails around the state and around the country, and we are eager to work with neighborhood associations, the city, and the county to address concerns and complete this important project.

Read more: Truman Park Trail still without clear path

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Via the Savannah Morning News:

City spokesman Bret Bell said the city is working with the county on an agreement to transfer sponsorship of the project to the city to comply with state Department of Transportation regulations. An agreement, he said, will also need to be drawn to transfer related sales tax funds to the city.

Read more: Savannah tentatively agrees to take over Truman Linear Park Trail

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Via Connect Savannah:

“Creating great public spaces does require imagination. News that Chatham County wishes to transfer control of the long-delayed Truman Linear Park Trail to the City of Savannah presents an excellent opportunity to imagine how the Truman Greenway will become a beneficial community asset.”

Read More: Where Imagination and Transportation Meet

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Via the Savannah Morning News:

“Ongoing delays that have stalled plans to complete a linear park along the Truman Parkway are disappointing. But if officials are serious about this project — and we think they should be — then do it right.This 4.8-mile, multi-use trail, which would parallel the Casey Canal and link Daffin Park and Lake Mayer, has been on the drawing board for about 40 years.”

Read More: Truman trail: Do it right

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Via the Savannah Morning News:

“On Feb. 14, the county commission unanimously voted to give the go-ahead for the county to transfer sponsorship of the project to the city, placing it in charge of the trail’s design and ensuring its construction complies with Georgia Department of Transportation regulations.”

Read More: Savannah considering taking over Truman Linear Park Trail

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Via the Savannah Morning News:

“City and county leaders often tout the importance of exercise, the dangers of obesity and diabetes and the high cost of health insurance premiums to public employees. There’s no better way to show their concern than by completing a trail that would encourage more people to walk, jog and ride bikes. The McQueen’s Island Trail and Truman Trail are two recreational amenities that improve this community’s quality of life. They’re worth the attention. And the public’s investment.”

Read More: Parks and recreation: Save the trails

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Via the Savannah Morning News:

“What is more this new plan is projected to increase Savannah’s walkability by nearly double. Not only does the park make Savannah’s citizens healthy but the city itself by reducing automotive travel and congestion, increasing bike-use with permeable paving.”

Titled the “Truman Rapid Transit Health Plan,” the proposed project is based on the reality that the walkability of Savannah’s downtown grid changed as the city grew southward and outward.

Read more: SCAD students tackle Savannah’s linear park and streetcar projects

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Via Connect Savannah:

“A public information open house, scheduled for Nov. 7, was cancelled due to unresolved questions over long-term maintenance and ownership of the trail. The City of Savannah has since signaled that it is willing to maintain the Truman Greenway, with some conditions, after completion of construction, which will be managed by Chatham County. An optimist might suggest this is an opportunity for city and county to resolve their differences and cooperate.”

Read more: On the trail campaign

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Via the Savannah Morning News:

“Savannah officials say they are receptive to the idea of maintaining the Truman Linear Trail Park if Chatham County officials are willing to tweak their design plans. That’s the consensus following a meeting Thursday between city officials.”

Read more: Savannah open to maintaining Truman Linear Park

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Via the Savannah Morning News:

“Let’s hope this dispute is temporary. This 4.8-mile, multi-use trail will be a community asset once it’s finally finished. Bureaucratic squabbling shouldn’t derail it.”

Read more: Public parks: Don’t bail on trail